Northeast Minneapolis
Quick Facts
County: Hennepin
Population: 39362
Size: 7.502 sq mi
Median Home Price: $255000
Average Rent Price: $834
Commute to Mpls: 13 minutes
Commute to StP: 22 minutes
Utilities
Electricity: Xcel Energy
Natural Gas: CenterPoint Energy
Garbage / Recycle: Minneapolis
Water: City
House Styles Website

Welcome to Northeast Minneapolis

Northeast Minneapolis is one of the most vibrant and exciting neighborhoods in the Twin Cities. It's actually a collection of smaller neighborhoods including Columbia Park, Waite Park, Marshall Terraces, Holland, Northeast Minneapolis Arts District, Audubon Park, Northeast Park, St. Anthony West, Bottineau, Sheridan, St. Anthony East, Logan Park, Windom Park, and Beltrami. Northeast Minneapolis is also fast-becoming a very desirable place to live, and that is a testimony to how much the area has to offer. It is affectionately nicknamed 'Nordeast" due to its beginning as a haven for Eastern European immigrants and the influence they've had on the area. It has roughly 39,000 people and is steadily growing and thriving.
One of the most recognizable neighborhoods is the Northeast Minneapolis Arts District, which was established in 2003 and was incorporated in 2015. It is recognized nationally as one of the best arts districts in the country (and was voted as THE best by USA Today readers in 2015), and it is a place any art lover will want to visit. There are several art buildings, including the California Building and the Solar Arts Building, and the annual Art-A-Whirl, sponsored by the Northeast Minneapolis Arts Association (NEMAA) takes visitors all over the district, including the art buildings, throughout the weekend. There is something arts-related to do almost every day of the year in this district, ranging from showings to galas and everything in between. The support for local artists is strong, and it's to the benefit of the entire neighborhood.
As you walk down the streets, you'll see cultural influences from all around the world! There's an Indian grocery store, Mexican grocery stores, an Afghani bakery that sells football-shaped pizza (and now is called Football Pizza!), and plenty of ethnic restaurants and stores.

Then and Now

Northeast Minneapolis started out as St. Anthony in 1848 and was incorporated as such in 1855. It held the first commercial mill at Saint Anthony Falls, and it was so profitable to have the mill at the falls, several more soon followed. Because of all the mills, it was nicknamed Mill City.
The first immigrants were mainly from Eastern Europe, including Russia, Poland, Slovakia, and the Ukraine. They were also from Lebanon, Germany, and Finland. By 1930, the demographics of the area was 60% immigrants and mostly working class. The Polish influence in particular has remained strong in the Northeast, even though the demographics have steadily changed over the years.
Another thing that has changed is that the area used to be industrial and slowly became more arts-oriented. There was a concerted effort in the 1900s and the 2000s to do just this, and it resulted in many of the industrial buildings being converted into artist spaces (and offices, too). The neighborhood is known for its commitment to arts, which is evidenced by one of the biggest annual art events--the Art-A-Whirl. It started as a way for independent artists to support each other, and it's grown into something that is enjoyed by several thousand people every year.

Boundaries

Green / Environmental

In 2013, Minneapolis adopted their Climate Action Plan, which put into place a comprehensive set of emission reduction strategies. These strategies cover 3 areas: Buildings and energy, Transportation and land use, Waste and recycling.
For buildings and energy, the goal is to reduce energy usage by 17%, and generate 10% of electricity from local, renewable sources. On the residential building side of things, Minneapolis is proposing a "home energy audit" as part of the Truth In Housing program (TIH or TISH, Truth In Sale of Housing). This would require sellers to have an energy score when listing their house for sale. They are proposing that the TISH inspectors be trained to perform this component of the inspection process. The end result of this energy score would be a single number, for example 37 on a scale of 1 to 100. 100 would mean that the house would have virtually no energy costs.
Another part of this program is to make incentives for sellers to improve their homes energy-wise so that they can get a higher sale price due to energy efficiencies. If they don't, the buyers will at least have some knowledge about the energy efficiency of the house, making it an incentive to them to improve the house energy-wise. Also on the residential side of things, Minneapolis is proposing a "time of rent" energy disclosure for renters. Renters currently have no way of knowing how much their utility bills will be before renting a unit. The disclosure would be mandated so that renters could compare units on energy efficiency. This would give incentives to the landlord (owners) to improve their buildings to make them more attractive to the rental market.
On the commercial side of things, some of them already have to do an energy score of sorts and disclose to purchasers. Minneapolis would like to extend that to all commercial buildings. They also have an Energy Reduction Challenge called the "Kilowatt Crackdown" to encourage commercial buildings to reduce usage.
For renewable energy, Minneapolis is trying to create policies that promote renewable energy, develop a "solar-ready" certification, and encourage "net-zero" buildings.
Making a building "solar-ready" adds virtually no cost at the time of construction, and would potentially have some value to purchasers. This would involve adding some structural supports and electrical conduit so that solar could be installed without adding structural support to the roof trusses, and/or digging in walls to add conduit. Both of these items can be added at a very low cost when in the construction phase.
What is a net-zero building? Basically net-zero means the building (or house) would generate all the energy it needs to power the building itself. This generally means that the building is super insulated so that it requires less energy to heat and cool the building, as well as solar panels to generate the energy it needs. Oftentimes this type of building uses geo-thermal heat pumps to heat and cool the building, running off solar energy. You can read more about "Net-Zero" buildings at this link.
You can read the entire action plan at the link below. Minneapolis Climate Action Plan: http://www.minneapolismn.gov/sustainability/climate-action-goals/climate-action-plan

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Real Estate

Northeast Minneapolis was developed over many decades. Predominantly the homes were built between 1900 and 1950's. This means that there are various styles of homes ranging from the craftsman, to the bungalow, to tudors, and spanish mission style, as well as post-war vernacular homes. This wide variety of homes gives buyers many choices of styles to look at. In the photos shown here, one is an example of a 1950's 4-level split house. The other happens to be a new construction townhome built in the bungalow style. If you are wanting to search for homes, or list your home for sale, click on the links below.

Market Trends in Northeast Minneapolis MN

# Houses Sold 446 (single family)
Median Sales Price $255000 (single family)
Average Age 1932 (single family)
Square Feet 1568 $175.73/sqft (single family)
# TH / Condo Sold 30 (townhouse/condo)
Median Sales Price $285000 (townhouse/condo)
Average Age 1981 (townhouse/condo)
Square Feet 1418 $199.84/sqft (townhouse/condo)

Parks

Audobon Park - (1320 29th Ave. NE, 612-370-4910, website) Audobon Park is tucked away behind a hill, and it's a nice place to take a breath away from the hectic nature of your day-to-day life. It has a walking path, a place you can play tennis, a basketball court, a softball field, and a soccer field. It also has a wading pool to frolic in, a Little Free Library so you can engage in books exchange, a playground, and a picnic area.
Boom Island Park - (724 Sibley St. NE, 612-230-6400, website) Boom Island Park is known primarily for one thing--the Boom Island Lighthouse. It's a functioning lighthouse that is a beacon during the winter and a fun attraction in the summer. In addition to the lighthouse, there are several other features such as a walking path and a biking path, a boat dock, a playground for the children, and a picnic area.
Cavell Park - (3435 Fillmore St. NE, 612-230-6400, website) Cavell Park is a small neighborhood park with plenty to do. It has a softball field, a baseball field, a tennis court, a basketball court, a playground for kids, and a picnic area. It's a great place to chat with neighbors or to go on a sunny summer day with the family and/or friends.
Columbia Park - (800 Columbia Pkwy., 612-230-6400, website) Columbia Park is a tranquil place of greenery with a lot to offer. It's known for the Columbia Golf Club and the Columbia Golf Driving Range and Learning Center, both of which are associated with the golf course, but it has plenty more to offer. It has archery, a horseshoe pit, a walking path and a cross-country ski trail, a soccer field, a rugby field, a tennis court, a playground, and sledding/tubing.
Deming Heights Park - (1115 St. Anthony Pkwy., 612-230-6400, website) Deming Heights Park is known for its hills, and it's great for hill running. It has a walking path if you'd like to enjoy the greenery at a more sedate pace. It also has a picnic area if you want to have a leisurely meal on a nice summer day.
Logan Recreation Center - (690 13th Ave. NE, 612-370-4927, website) Logan Recreation Center is a neighborhood rec center with many amenities. In the center itself, there is a computer lab, a gym, and a craft room. Outdoors, there is a softball field, an ice-skating rink, and a walking path. For the kids, there is a playground and a wading pool. There is also a picnic area for when you want to take a break from the activities and enjoy the sun on your face.
Marshall Terrace Park - (2740 Marshall St. NE, 612-230-6400, website) Marshall Terrace Park (2740 Marshall St. NE, 612-230-6400) is a cozy neighborhood park with several fun amenities. This includes a softball field, a basketball court, a baseball field, and a wading pool. It also has a playground for the kids and a picnic area so you can enjoy a tasty meal with your family/friends.
Northeast Athletic Field Park - (1615 Pierce St. NE, 612-370-4920, website) Northeast Athletic Field Park is the place to go if you are into playing sports. There are several fields/courts, including a football field, a baseball field, a soccer field, a softball field, a tennis court, and a basketball court. There is also a water park if you are more into aquatic fun. There is also a walking path if you prefer a more solitary and sedate form of exercise, and a playground for the young ones. There is also a picnic area for you to enjoy a nice meal after a day of fun and frolic.
Northeast Recreation Center - (1530 Johnson St. NE, 612-370-4920, website) Northeast Recreation Center is a new facility with top-notch equipment opened in 2018, and the staff is very friendly and helpful. Inside, there is a game area with table tennis and foosball, a gym, a walking track, and more. Outside is a sports' lover's delight. There is soccer field, a baseball field, a tennis court, a water park, a walking path, and much, much more. Take your family or take your friends, and you're sure to have a great time.
Waite Park - (1810 34th Ave. NE, 612-370-4959, website) Waite Park is connected to a nearby school, Waite Community School, so they share a lot of programming. There is a lot to do here as you may have guessed. There is a softball field, a soccer field, a volleyball (sand) court, a baseball field, a football field, a basketball court, a horseshoe pit, and a tennis court. It also has a walking path, a wading pool, and a picnic area. There is a Little Free Library if you feel like reading a book or donating a book.
Windom Northeast Park - (2251 NE Hayes St., 612-370-4905, website) Windom Northeast Park is a neighborhood park that has a lot to offer for anyone who likes outdoor fun. It has many fields/courts, including a baseball field, a soccer field, a tennis court, a pickleball court, a basketball court, a football field, and a softball field. For the winter sports-loving fans, there is a hockey rink, an ice-skating rink, and a broomball rink. It also has a wading pool if you just want to cool down on a hot summer's day. There is also a new playground for the children, a Little Free Library if you want to give or take a book, and a picnic area.
Windom Northeast Recreation Center - (2251 Hayes St. NE, 612-370-4905, website) Windom Northeast Recreation Center is a neighborhood gathering place that is fun for kids of all ages. It has a gym, a craft room, and a computer lab. For the more sporty types, there is a tennis court, a baseball field, a football field, and more. If you like vigorous activities in the winter, it also has a broomball rink, a hockey rink, and an ice-skating rink. If you just want to soak up the sun in the summer and read, there is a Little Free Library and a picnic area. It also has a wading pool and a playground including a zip-line for the kids.

Restaurants

Betty Danger's Country Club - (2501 Marshall St NE, 612-315-4997, website) Betty Danger's is a zany nightclub with a whole backstory as to who Betty is. She's the 'youngest sister' of Saint Sabrina and Psycho Suzi, all three establishments are owned by Leslie Bock. The tagline is, "A Country Club for the 99%", and their aim is for everyone to have a fun time in this retro-flavored restaurant/bar. The menu includes amusing seasonal names such as Mary's Bloody, Mrs. Claus Chicken & Brie Sandwich, Roasted Chestnuts, and Turkey Leftovers. For dessert, try the Baked Alaska Flambe. They also have vegan options. On the drink side, sip on a Santa's Bootleg or the Very Naughty Hot Chocolate. They offer a membership which "is never required...it's just less dull."
Chimborazo - (2851 Central Ave. NE, 612-788-1328, website) Chimborazo is a cozy and welcoming Ecuadorian restaurant, opened by Marcos Pinguil, who wanted to bring the tastes of his homeland to share with Minneapolitans. The atmosphere is warm and bright, and the service is great. The menu includes yuca frita, sanduche de pernil, and chaulafan. They have several gluten-free options as well. They also have a brunch menu which includes tungurahua, a specialty pancake, churrasco. There are several tasty options, so there is something for everyone.
Football Pizza - (2339 Central Ave. NE, 612-782-0169, website) Football Pizza started out as the Crescent Moon Bakery, and it was known for it's Afghan dishes as well as its football-shaped pizzas. The latter was the talk of the town, and the name change reflects the popularity of the football pizzas. The restaurant is comfortable and casual, and the staff is friendly. On the Afghani side of the menu, it includes kabobs, tikkas, kourmas, and gyros. On the pizza side, there's a meat lovers pizza, a cheese lovers pizza, and a spinach lovers pizza among others. The baklava is a sweet ending to the meal.
Glam Doll Donuts - (519 Central Ave. NE, 612-223-8071, website) Glam Doll Donuts is the brainchild (and the second store, the first being on Eat Street) of Teresa Fox and Arwyn Birch in which they combine glamour, sass, and mouthwatering donuts. The store is funky fresh with a giant pink couch and a rotating art gallery. The service is upbeat, and the donuts are worth waiting in line for. The donuts have fun names like Femme Fatale, Misfit, and Pinup Girl. One of their most popular donuts is a savory one called The Bellybomb, and it's a mac & cheese donut that will have you coming back for more. They have vegan versions of many of their donuts as well. They can pair their donuts with beer, wine, cocktails, and/or coffee.
Gorkha Palace - (23 4th St. NE, 612-886-3451, website) Gorkha Palace is a Nepalese, Tibetan, and Indian restaurant run by Rashimi and Sarala. They have a firm commitment to the environment and sustainability, and they are proud to be a green restaurant with over 90% of their ingredients being organic. They source their products locally whenever possible as well. The restaurant is casual and inviting, and the service is warm. They have vegetarian options and a vegan dish of the day (as well as other vegan options), and they do catering, too. The menu includes naan, samosas, chicken chili, and they have a buffet.
Grumpy's Bar & Grill - (2200 4th St. NE, 612-789-7429, website) Grumpy's Bar & Grill is a beloved watering hole that has been a neighborhood fixture for two decades. It's known for its tater tots, and you most certainly can't eat just one. They have live music, private rooms, and because they are proud Minnesotans, Hot Dish Happy Hour. It's a comfortable and low-key place where anyone would feel comfortable chilling. They're serious about their beer, which they serve with a smile.
Hazel's Northeast - (2859 Johnson St. NE, 612-788-4778, website) Hazel's Northeast is a neighborhood favorite and is always bustling with loyal customers. It was opened by a woman, Helen 'Hazel' Steve, who made pies at a local diner and had demands she open her own restaurant. Fifty-some years later, the restaurant is still in the family and still as popular. They also feature local artists on their walls, which is great for the art community, and they use locally-sourced products when possible. Their menu includes brisket hash, a meat waffle, a curried chicken sandwich, and a chicken pot pie.
Holy Land - (2513 Central Ave. NE, 612-781-2627, website) Holy Land is more than just a restaurant--it's also a deli, a grocery store, and a bakery. It was opened in 1987 by Wajdi Wadi as a tiny Halal grocery store, and it has expanded by leaps and bounds ever since. It's a neighborhood staple and known throughout the Twin Cities for its authentic Mediterranean cuisine and adherence to Halal/Zabhihah strictures. The restaurant has a casual and comfortable atmosphere and good service. They use products that are as eco-friendly/ethical as possible, and they have gluten-free options, vegetarian options, and vegan-friendly options, too. Their menu includes a spinach pie, kebobs, shawirma, and wood-fire rotisserie chicken. For dessert, try their chocolate baklava for a twist on the old favorite.
Maya Cuisine - (1840 Central Ave. NE, 612-789-0775, website) Maya Cuisine is a colorful and cheerful Mayan restaurant that has an inviting atmosphere and a friendly staff. They have handmade corn tortillas which are the base for many of their dishes. They offer burritos, tacos, tostadas, tamales, and more. They believe in simple dishes with fresh ingredients for optimal taste, and they have vegetarian options.
PinKU - (20 University Ave. NE, 612-584-3167, website) PinKU is a fine-casual Japanese restaurant that is in an industrial building that has an arty feel to it. It was opened in 2016 by Xiaoteng Huang and chef John Sugimura, and they were inspired to create high-quality authentic Japanese street food. Their menu is small so they can offer the freshest quality dishes, handmade in front of you each day. Their fish is purchased daily by local fishmongers. The menu includes crispy shrimp radish noodles, seared salmon rice, and tuna poke.
Psycho Suzi's Motor Lounge - (1900 Marshall St NE, 612-788-9069, website) Psycho Suzi's Motor Lounge opened in 2003 by Leslie Bock in its original location with sass, verve, and a lot of tattoos. The irreverent atmosphere coupled with the tiki culture made it instantly popular, and it became even more so when it moved into its current location in 2012. The current location is bigger and swankier than the old one, but the attitude remains offbeat and counter-culture. Leslie Bock also owns Saint Sabrina's Parlor in Purgatory (tattoo/piercing shop) and Betty Danger's (an alternative country club). The menu includes poutine tots, Minneapolis pizzas, and banh mi chicken sliders. The brunch menu has the El Camino, Biscayne Biscuits, and The Matador. Their drinks have fun names like Crummy Scoundrels, Eruption in Paradise, and Miserable Bastard.
Sen Yai Sen Lek - (2422 Central Ave. NE, 612-781-3046, website) Sen Yai Sen Lek is a Thai restaurant that mixes authenticity with sustainability, and the result is fresh and tasty Thai food. The owners, Joe and Holly Hatch-Surisook opened the restaurant in 2008, and it's been a neighborhood favorite ever since. The atmosphere is cheerful and bustling, and the staff is friendly. They source as much of their products locally as possible, and they will offer to compost your leftovers if you don't want to take them home with you. The menu includes pad Thai (of course), geow naam moo daeng, and pad bai gra pow. You can finish your meal with a delicious dessert, such as sticky rice and mango (khao neow mamuang). They have vegetarian options and also gluten-free dishes, too. They also have takeout.
The Anchor Fish & Chips - (302 13th Ave. NE, 612-676-1300, website) The Anchor Fish & Chips is a cozy and casual restaurant that serves traditional British pub food. The service is friendly, and the food is authentic. The menu includes the fish & chips, shepherd's pie, and toasty & chips. They also have a poutine that puts an Irish twist on the Canadian classic by adding poitin (distilled beverage made from potatoes) to the gravy. They also have take away and a food truck.
The Mill Northeast - (1851 Central Ave. NE, 612-315-2340, website) The Mill Northeast is a warm and friendly restaurant that has a comfortable atmosphere and a friendly staff. They make their dishes from scratch, which is also how they make their drinks. They make American food that is elevated, including their signature biscone & gravy dish that is half-biscuit, half-scone, and smothered either with a mushroom or a sausage gravy. The rest of the menu includes beer-breaded cheese curds with an incredible beet ketchup, a shrimp etouffee, and a seasonally-appropriate winter portage pasta. Finish off your meal with a poinsettia creme brulee for something different. They have vegan-friendly options, too.
Young Joni - (165 13th Ave. NE, 612-345-5719, website) Young Joni was opened in 2016 by Ann Kim, a lauded chef, to much anticipation ad high acclaim. It's a restaurant with a back bar, and the atmosphere is casually elegant. The staff is friendly, and they believe in giving back to the community. To that end, they donate to local causes, which bolsters the entire community. The menu includes pizzas, Korean beef short ribs, and grilled whole fish. The cocktail menu is short and classic with the old fashioned heading the list. The back bar has a clever concept in that the drink menu is called Young Joni High and the cocktails harken back to high school days. The Debate Team, Most Likely to Need a Lawyer, and The Hall Monitor are three of the amusingly-named drinks.

Shopping

A Bag Lady - (2856 Johnson St. NE, 612-788-4243, website) A Bag Lady is a cozy women's fashion store that is filled with fun and funky items. The atmosphere is whimsical, and the service is friendly. They sell clothing, purses, jewelry, and so much more. If you're looking for a tiara plastered with fake gems or a ring that looks like a big flower, you can find it here. If you want a flashy scarf to consolidate a fabulous outfit, this is the place for you.
findfurnish - (13 5th St. NE, 612-730-3389, website) findfurnish is a vintage store that offer high-quality products by a knowledgeable staff. The store is tucked away in a brownstone building, and it is filled with interesting finds. They have furniture, clothing, posters, and records, and they rotate their selections on a regular basis. Don't be fooled by the unassuming facade because once you walk inside, there will be plenty to see.
I Like You - (501 1st Ave. NE, 612-208-0249, website) I Like You was opened in another neighborhood in 2007 by two women, Sarah Sweet and Angela Lessman who had a vision of running as store that nurtured crafters who might have difficulty selling their wares elsewhere. They moved to their current location in 2009 (and have expanded to two other locations), and they sell art from over 200 local and independent artists on consignment. The store is bright and lively, and the staff members are cheerful and knowledgeable. There is plenty to see here, including jewelry, paintings, mugs, candles, cards, and more. There is a mural on the outside front wall that is colorful and engaging, proclaiming how much the store likes you.
Key North Boutique - (515 1st Ave. NE, 612-455-6666, website) Key North Boutique (515 1st Ave. NE, 612-455-6666) is a store that believes in both luxury and fair trade. They feature exclusive women's lines in clothing and jewelry (and other accessories) from local and international designers. They support fair trade, sustainability, and a living wage for the designers who supply them with their wares. In shopping at this store, you can feel good about looking good.
Magus Books & Herbs - (1848 Central Ave. NE, 612-379-7669, website) Magus Books & Herbs was founded in 1992 as a tiny curiosity shop filled with books about magic and spirituality, and it has grown and expanded in the ensuing years. The store is open and warm, and the staff is knowledgeable and friendly. They are a one-stop shop for everything spiritual, regardless of your affiliation. They have runes, wands, chalices, athames, and so much more. They also have a vast inventory of herbs and resins, and they are very willing to talk about their stock with their customers.
Patina - (2305 18th Ave. NE, 612-788-8933, website) Patina is a local chain of stores started with a flagship store in South Minneapolis in 1993 by a husband-and-wife team, Rick Haase and Christine Ward. It is a cozy and welcoming shop that displays different artistic wares that are perfectly suited as gifts for others or yourself. The staff members are friendly, and you'll be tempted to linger as you browse through all the interesting items. They sell cards, mugs, books, curios, and more.
Rewind - (2852B Johnson St. NE, 612-788-9870, website) Rewind was opened in 2008 by Sarah Hoese because she wanted to share her passion for vintage clothing and unique contemporary clothing as well. The store is filled with vintage goodness, including clothing, jewelry, boots, scarves, purses, and more. It's a great place to go and browse because you're sure to find an unexpected gem.
Rose Shop - (1903 Johnson St. NE, 612-788-2328, website) Rose Shop is a family-owned florist shop that has been making flower arrangements for the neighborhood for over fourteen years. They like helping you celebrate all the big milestones in your life, be it a wedding, a birthday, or an anniversary. They import Ecuadorian roses, several varieties, which adds a nice touch to their handmade bouquets. They also have other gifts such as stuffed animals and balloons.

Nightlife

331 Club - (331 13th Ave. NE, 612-331-1746, website) 331 Club is a local watering hole with live music every night in addition to trivia nights and a jukebox in the bathroom. It's a casual place to hang out with your friends, enjoying the music and the free-flowing beers. They serve your bar food basics such as fries, big brats, and pizza. If you're looking for a low-key night out with a couple of your pals, this is the place to go.
Al's Place - (2500 University Ave. NE, 612-594-5876, website) Al's Place is where you go if you're a cool cat who wants to get your grub on with other like-minded gentlemen and ladies. It's steeped in the attitude of the 20s, and it features a speakeasy every Friday night. It's a place you go if you want to get dressed to the nines and enjoy a night out on the town. The menu includes chicken a la king, Sunday gravy, and mussels fra diavolo. If you really want to get into the swing of things, you can try the 1920s Campbell tomato soup cake. They have a burlesque brunch every Sunday.
Betty Danger's Country Club - (2501 Marshall St NE, 612-315-4997, website) Betty Danger's is a zany nightclub with a whole backstory as to who Betty is. She's the 'youngest sister' of Saint Sabrina and Psycho Suzi, all three establishments are owned by Leslie Bock. The tagline is, "A Country Club for the 99%", and their aim is for everyone to have a fun time in this retro-flavored restaurant/bar. The menu includes amusing seasonal names such as Mary's Bloody, Mrs. Claus Chicken & Brie Sandwich, Roasted Chestnuts, and Turkey Leftovers. For dessert, try the Baked Alaska Flambe. They also have vegan options. On the drink side, sip on a Santa's Bootleg or the Very Naughty Hot Chocolate. They offer a membership which "is never required...it's just less dull."
Ground Zero Nightclub - (15 4th St. NE, 612-378-5115, website) Ground Zero Nightclub is a nightclub unlike any other in the Twin Cities. The music is alternative/goth, and it's a place to let your hair down and have a lot of fun. Whether you go for the drinks, the dancing, or the shows, you're guaranteed to have a good time. They have themed nights for which you can dress to the nines and fully express yourself. It's a place for people who are open-minded and like to explore alternative lifestyles.
Grumpy's Bar & Grill - (2200 4th St. NE, 612-789-7429, website) Grumpy's Bar & Grill is a beloved watering hole that has been a neighborhood fixture for two decades. It's known for its tater tots, and you most certainly can't eat just one. They have live music, private rooms, and because they are proud Minnesotans, Hot Dish Happy Hour. It's a comfortable and low-key place where anyone would feel comfortable chilling. They're serious about their beer, which they serve with a smile.
Jimmy's Bar & Lounge - (1828 4th St. NE, 612-788-1383, website) Jimmy's Bar & Lounge is a neighborhood dive bar that is welcoming in a relaxed way. They have meat raffles on Saturday and other fun events such as guessing the weight of a pumpkin. When you want to hoist a few with your friends or make new ones, you can't go wrong swinging by this bar.
Psycho Suzi's Motor Lounge - (1900 Marshall St NE, 612-788-9069, website) Psycho Suzi's Motor Lounge opened in 2003 by Leslie Bock in its original location with sass, verve, and a lot of tattoos. The irreverent atmosphere coupled with the tiki culture made it instantly popular, and it became even more so when it moved into its current location in 2012. The current location is bigger and swankier than the old one, but the attitude remains offbeat and counter-culture. Leslie Bock also owns Saint Sabrina's Parlor in Purgatory (tattoo/piercing shop) and Betty Danger's (an alternative country club). The menu includes poutine tots, Minneapolis pizzas, and banh mi chicken sliders. The brunch menu has the El Camino, Biscayne Biscuits, and The Matador. Their drinks have fun names like Crummy Scoundrels, Eruption in Paradise, and Miserable Bastard.
Stanley's Northeast Bar Room - (2500 University Ave. NE, 612-788-2529, website) Stanley's Northeast Bar Room (2500 University Ave. NE, 612-788-2529) is an inviting and casual neighborhood bar that has the best dog patio in town. When it's warm enough, the dogs are invited to dine on the patio with a three-course menu. In the bar itself, the service is friendly, and it's a great place to watch a game with your friends while hoisting a few. The menu is elevated pub grub, including Nordeast pickles, banana foster pancakes, burgers (there's a vegan one), and bowls. If you're a chocolate lover, you have to try their chocolate explosion bread pudding with chocolate ice cream.
Vegas Lounge - (965 Central Ave. NE, 612-378-1873, website) Vegas Lounge is all about the karaoke, which they offer seven nights a week. They won the City Pages' award (by staff and readers) for best karaoke in the Twin Cities in 2018. They have drinks and bar food such as burgers, pizza, and chicken wings, but you're really there to sing your heart out.
Young Joni - (165 13th Ave. NE, 612-345-5719, website) Young Joni was opened in 2016 by Ann Kim, a lauded chef, to much anticipation ad high acclaim. It's a restaurant with a back bar, and the atmosphere is casually elegant. The staff is friendly, and they believe in giving back to the community. To that end, they donate to local causes, which bolsters the entire community. The menu includes pizzas, Korean beef short ribs, and grilled whole fish. The cocktail menu is short and classic with the old fashioned heading the list. The back bar has a clever concept in that the drink menu is called Young Joni High and the cocktails harken back to high school days. The Debate Team, Most Likely to Need a Lawyer, and The Hall Monitor are three of the amusingly-named drinks.

Community Arts & Recreation

California Building - (2205 California St. NE, 612-788-5551, website) California Building is one of five Northeast properties owned by Jennifer Young and John Kremer, who are partners in both business and life. They are committed to nurturing local artists (and flora), and this is one way they do that. It is one of the first studio buildings in Minneapolis, and it was opened in 1991. There are over 80 artists creating arts in this space, and they participate in Art-A-Whirl every year.
Casket Arts Building - (681 17th Ave. NE, 612-788-5551, website) Casket Arts Building is one of five Northeast properties owned by Jennifer Young and John Kremer, who are partners in both business and life. They are committed to nurturing local artists (and flora), and this is one way they do that. The building has been around since 1882 when it was in the actual casket business until 2005 when the current owners turned it into an artistic space while maintaining the historic feel of the building. The Casket Arts Building is part of the Casket Arts Community which has over 140 artists/art-based businesses that support one another. Not only do the artists have their own studios, they open their studios to the public on a regular basis including during Art-A-Whirl.
Logan Recreation Center - (690 13th Ave. NE, 612-370-4927, website) Logan Recreation Center is a neighborhood rec center with many amenities. In the center itself, there is a computer lab, a gym, and a craft room. Outdoors, there is a softball field, an ice-skating rink, and a walking path. For the kids, there is a playground and a wading pool. There is also a picnic area for when you want to take a break from the activities and enjoy the sun on your face.
Northeast Recreation Center - (1530 Johnson St. NE, 612-370-4920, website) Northeast Recreation Center is a new facility with top-notch equipment opened in 2018, and the staff is very friendly and helpful. Inside, there is a game area with table tennis and foosball, a gym, a walking track, and more. Outside is a sports' lover's delight. There is soccer field, a baseball field, a tennis court, a water park, a walking path, and much, much more. Take your family or take your friends, and you're sure to have a great time.
Northrup King Building - (1500 Jackson St. NE, 612-363-5612, website) Northrup King Building was built in 1917 and is actually 10 buildings in one complex. It was built for the Northrup King & Co. seed company, and they owned the building until the late 1980s. Then, after it was sold, it went through a transformation from seed company to an important hub of artist endeavors. It now holds over 190 artists and arts-related businesses as well as 30 other nonprofit organizations and entrepreneurs. The artists are passionate about their open studio tours, and many of them love getting to know the public. The building is open to the public every first Thursday of the month from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., and the artists participate both in Art-A-Whirl and Art Attack. The latter is exclusive to this building, and it's three days with over 300 visual artists and plenty of music.
Windom Northeast Recreation Center - (2251 Hayes St. NE, 612-370-4905, website) Windom Northeast Recreation Center is a neighborhood gathering place that is fun for kids of all ages. It has a gym, a craft room, and a computer lab. For the more sporty types, there is a tennis court, a baseball field, a football field, and more. If you like vigorous activities in the winter, it also has a broomball rink, a hockey rink, and an ice-skating rink. If you just want to soak up the sun in the summer and read, there is a Little Free Library and a picnic area. It also has a wading pool and a playground including a zip-line for the kids.

Events

APR: Northeast Annual Easter Egg Hunt - (Logan Park, 690 13th Ave. NE,, , website) The Northeast Annual Easter Egg Hunt is hosted by the Mill City Church, and it includes much more than the usual egg hunting (for kids up to 12). There is racing, food, a bouncy house, face-painting, crafts, and other fun things to do. Come for the egg hunt, stay for the other activities.
MAY: Art-A-Whirl - (Northeast Minneapolis Arts District, 612-788-1679, website) Art-A-Whirl started as a small group of artists wanting to support one another's work, and it's grown into something that is truly amazing. It is now sponsored by the Northeast Minneapolis Arts Association, and it's eagerly anticipated every year by arts lover throughout the Twin Cities. Three days. 800 artists. 60 locations. Lots of food and drinks to nibble on/eat/drink as you enjoy almost every medium of art possible. It's a big open studio tour of some of the most influential local artists, and thousands of Minnesotans participate in the annual event.
JUN: Johnstock - (2900 Johnson St NE, , website) Johnstock is Northeast Minneapolis's version of Woodstock for highlighting local artists every summer. They start with a family-friendly movie, and then it's tons of art, music, and food. It is sponsored by the Johnson Street Merchants, and it's been a yearly event for over a decade and a half.
JUL: Northeast Food Truck Rally - (Able Seedhouse + Brewery, 1121 Quincy St. NE,, , website) The Northeast Food Truck Rally was started by the MN Food Truck Association in 2016 and is sponsored by Able Seedhouse & Brewery (where it's held) and Meals On Wheels. There is food from a dozen food trucks, fine crafted beers, live music, and games. The event is free, and there is a wristband fee if you intend to imbibe. All proceeds go to Meals on Wheels, which is a program that delivers food to the elderly and people with disabilities. It's a great summer event that benefits a great cause.
SEP: Annual Lebanese Festival - (St. Maron's Church, 602 University Ave. NE,, 612-379-2758, website) The Annual Lebanese Festival has been happening for nearly 30 years, and it's hosted by St. Maron's Catholic Church. It's a weekend in September of Lebanese food, Arabic music, and convivial drinks. There is also a traditional Middle Eastern Market, a silent auction, and a raffle. There's plenty for the children as well, including games, treats, and an inflatable slide. There is definitely something for everyone to enjoy.
OCT: Nordeast Big River Brew Fest - (East Side Neighborhood Services, 1700 2nd St. NE,, , website) The East Side Neighborhood Services sponsor this annual fall event in which they provide food, craft beers, and live music. It is a time for community members to gather, have fun together, and play hammerschlagen while eating and drinking. All the proceeds go to the East Side Neighborhood Services so they can continue to help out the community.

Schools

Mouse over each number to get the school rating. Clicking on the number will link you to their (greatschools.org) website with detailed information on each individual school. We are in no way affiliated with GreatSchools.org.
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