Saint Louis Park
Quick Facts
County: Hennepin
Population: 49029
Size: 10.84 sq mi
Median Home Price: $307900
Average Rent Price: $1522
Commute to Mpls: 15 minutes
Commute to StP: 24 minutes
Utilities
Electricity: Xcel Energy
Natural Gas: CenterPoint Energy
Garbage / Recycle: Various
House Styles Website

Welcome to Saint Louis Park

St. Louis Park is a first-ring suburb just outside of Minneapolis with roughly 45,000 people.  It has the charm of a small town, and it's less than five minutes from Minneapolis, so there's easy access to city amenities. It is renowned for its parks and for its commercial enterprises. There are 51 parks, which covers 11.5% of St. Louis Park. The parks include the Westwood Hills Nature Center, Wolfe Park, Browndale Park, and Oak Hill Park. There are bike trails that connect St. Louis Park to Minneapolis, Uptown, Chaska, and Hopkins so if you're a bike enthusiast, there will be plenty of trails for you to explore. St. Louis Park is focused on building a strong support system for their youth. It started in 1992 with a speech by the school superintendent to the The Rotary Club about the problems facing the youth, and two members of The Rotary Club decided to tackle the problem.  A program called Children First emerged out of these discussions, and they bring together different sectors of the community to help out children in need. It is dedicated to the arts, and it has an Arts & Culture Grant Program that nurtures the creativity of local artists. It's not just limited to the visual arts, either, as they give grants in the areas of music, theater, film, dance, and multimedia as well. The artists do not need to live in St. Louis park, but the projects must take place in the city. In addition, every year, the City allows local artists to display and sell (if they wish) their artwork in the lobby of the third floor of City Hall. There are thirty-five neighborhoods in St. Louis Park, and you will find the links to each one below.
Amhurst Aquila Birchwood
Blackstone Bronx Park Brooklawns
Brookside Browndale Cedar Manor
Cedarhurst Cobblecrest Creekside
Crestview Eliot Eliot View
Elmwood Fern Hill Kilmer
Lake Forest Lenox Meadowbrook
Minikahda Oaks Minikahda Vista Minnehaha
Oak Hill Pennsylvania Park Shelard Park
Sorensen South Oak Hill Texa Tonka
Triangle Westdale Westwood Hills
Willow Park Wolfe Park

Then and Now

St. Louis Park started as a village called Elmwood in the 1860s. There was a petition to incorporate as the Village of St. Louis Park in August, 1886, and it was officially registered in November of the same year. The first part of the name stemmed from the Minneapolis and St. Louis Railway that ran through the village, whereas 'Park' was added to differentiate it from St. Louis, Missouri. Elmwood is now a neighborhood within St. Louis Park. In its early years, St. Louis Park was heavily focused on industrial development, thanks to a lumber baron named Thomas Barlow Walker and several of his wealthy friends. By the 1890s, St. Louis Park had over 600 industrial jobs, and a majority of them had to do with the manufacturing of agricultural tools. In 1893, however, there was a financial panic that caused many of the wealthy industrialists, including Walker, to divest from St. Louis Park and go to greener pastures. Things  improved in 1899-1900 when the Peavey-Haglin Experimental Concrete Grain Elevator was built as an alternative to wooden elevators because the latter were prone to catching fire. At the time, it was nicknamed the 'Peavey's Folly', and there were predictions it would fail, but it performed admirably. Once the experiments were concluded, the PHECGE was not used as a grain silo again, but it set the standard for grain elevators in the future. Economic growth was slow in the early 1900s because the streetcars made it easy to get to Minneapolis and shop there. The population did more than double in the '20s, from roughly 2,200 people to roughly 4,700, and there was an uptick in the building of homes in the '30s, but everything came to a halt during World War 2. Afterwards, the population grew exponentially. The population was nearly 7,800 in 1940, and then it exploded to nearly 40,000 by 1955. The development side of the city also took off after WW2. 60% of the houses built in St. Louis happened in the late '40s through the early '50s. Retailers also made their way to St. Louis park during this time period. The first Minnesota shopping center, Lilac Way, was built in St. Louis Park in the late 1940s, followed by the Miracle Mile shopping center and Knollwood Mall. The village was officially turned into a city in 1954 because it was outgrowing its village roots. Becoming a city allowed them to hire a city manager to ease their growing pains. Now, St. Louis Park is a thriving community that embraces diversity and the rich heritage of the members in their community.

Boundaries

Green / Environmental

St. Louis Park is serious about sustainability and environmental stewardship. They have an ambitious Climate Action Plan that came about when students brought their concerns about the environment to the city council. The Climate Action Plan starts with the premise that St. Louis intends to be carbon neutral by 2040, and it outlines the steps necessary to attain this goal. As a way to reach this one big goal, the plan lists seven other concrete midway goals, such as achieving 100% renewable electricity by 2030. There are several projects planned to meet the ultimate goal, including ones that reduce emissions, has building retrofits, and encourages the community in general to be more environmentally conscious since the government only accounts for 2% of the electricity use in the city. They also want to steer people in the community towards electric cars, have passed an ordinance requiring new and reconstructed parking lots to include EV charging stations, and are planning on having light rail stops in St. Louis Park to encourage less motor vehicle usage.        

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Real Estate

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Market Trends in Saint Louis Park MN

# Houses Sold 661 (single family)
Median Sales Price $307900 (single family)
Average Age 1951 (single family)
Square Feet 1890 $189.47/sqft (single family)
# TH / Condo Sold 271 (townhouse/condo)
Median Sales Price $184000 (townhouse/condo)
Average Age 1986 (townhouse/condo)
Square Feet 1178 $247.04/sqft (townhouse/condo)

Parks

Dakota Park - (2643 Dakota Ave. S,, 952-924-2562, website) Dakota Park is a popular park in part because it has an off-leash area for dogs. If you have a canine friend, they will enjoy romping around this park. There is a specific part of this dog area for smaller dogs who would prefer to play away from larger dogs. The park also has softball and baseball fields, walking and hiking trails, and playground equipment for the kids. There is a batting cage if you want to practice your swing, and there is a shelter with picnic tables if you want a place to rest and/or eat.
Oak Hill Park - (3201 Rhode Island Ave. S,, 952-924-2540, website) Oak Hill Park is a favorite summer spot in the neighborhood because of the many activities it offers. These activities include ice skating, hockey, and baseball and softball. It also has basketball and trails, the latter if you prefer to hike rather than play a ball game. Oak Hill Park also has a state-of-the-art splash pad that is 2,350 square feet. There are also sculptures and structures all around as art is a very important focus of this park. There are also picnic tables and shelters if you want to take a minute to relax and have something to eat.
Westwood Hills Nature Center - (8300 W Franklin Ave.,, 952-924-2544, website) The Westwood Hills Nature Center has 160 acres of pristine nature for visitors to marvel at and enjoy. The flora include woods, marshes, and restored prairies. There are animals as well, such as owls, foxes, deer, various birds, and turtles. It officially opened in 1981, and it has been a place of respite ever since. It's a place to learn about nature, and they have a new interpretive center project that when completed will be a better facility for the nature center. Some of the activities that can be enjoyed at the WHNC are archery, snowshoeing, birdwatching, and geocaching.
Wolfe Park - (3700 Monterey Dr.,, 952-924-2540, website) Wolfe Park is a family favorite because of the playground area with lots of fun playground gear for kids to play on. The park itself is filled with serene nature that is reflective of the beauty surrounding it, and it's the perfect place for a contemplative stroll. The amenities include basketball courts, sand volleyball courts, outdoor grills, a sliding hill, and paved trails. The Veterans' Memorial Amphitheater is on a hill on the south side of the park, and it has both the Veterans' Memorial wall area and the Veterans' Memorial rock, too. The park also has two picnic shelters as well.

Restaurants

Ariana Kabob & Gyro Bistro - (7115 Cedar Lake Rd.,, 952-546-8000, website) Ariana Kabob & Gyro Bistro is a family-owned Mediterranean/Afghan restaurant that has a warm and homey feel to it, and the staff is courteous and helpful. It opened in 2013 with the goal to bring authentic and tasty Afghan and Mediterranean cuisine to Minnesota. They have a street food menu with fresh ingredients and bold flavors, which they are eager to share with you. The menu includes Afghani Eggplant, the Screamin' Spicy Gyro, Chicken Shawarma, and the Falafel Bowl. They have catering as well if you want Mediterranean food for your special event. They have both delivery and pickup on the catering side.
Best of India - (8120 Minnetonka Blvd.,, 952-935-2320, website) Best of India is an Indian restaurant in a strip mall that has a homey atmosphere and a friendly staff. The owner, Autul Mondal, has worked in the service business since he came to America in 2000, and he opened Best of India in 2005. The dishes are prepared by hand with a careful blend of spices to make every dish delicious. The menu includes Tandoori Chicken, Boti Kabob, and Gobi Manchurian. It also has chicken specials such as Chicken Sabzi, lamb specials like Rogan Josh, and Tandoori breads such as naan. This is just the tip of their menu, and they have several vegetarian and vegan options. They have a buffet for lunch as well.
Honey & Rye Bakehouse - (4501 Excelsior Blvd, 612-844-2555, website)
Mill Valley Kitchen - (3906 Excelsior Blvd.,, 925-358-2000, website) Mill Valley Kitchen is a Northern Californian-inspired restaurant that focuses on fresh and seasonal ingredients. They believe in sustainability and local sourcing when possible. They also believe that eating healthily can also mean eating delicious food. The atmosphere is refined, yet relaxed, and the service is attentive. Their menu includes Miso Glazed Seabass, Vegan Power Bowl, Bison Burger, and Lemon Parmesan Kale. Their drink menu includes wines primarily from Northern California, but also around the world, such as Cakebread from Napa Valley, beers like Bauhaus, signature cocktails such as Siren's Song, and nonalcoholic drinks like ginger beer.
Raku Sushi & Lounge -- WEST END - (5371 W 16th St.,, 952-378-1803, website) Raki Sushi & Lounge -- WEST END is an Asian fusion restaurant with cheerful and colorful decor that includes cutout fish dangling from the ceiling. The atmosphere is relaxed, yet refined, and the service is excellent. It is located in The Shops at West End, and while the exterior is nondescript, the interior believes that. They have a menu that is crafted to delight every palate from those who prefer traditional fare to those who are excited to try something new and different. The menu includes many different kinds of sushi, obviously, including hand rolls, rolls, and sashimi. It also has tempura, teppanyaki, noodle dishes, and rice dishes, too. The featured menu includes Tuna Pizza, Kumamoto Oyster 3 Ways, and Spicy Kimchee Squid.
Wok in the Park - (3005 Utah Ave. S,, 952-657-5754, website) A Wok in the Park is an Asian fusion restaurant with nature-based decor that is calming and relaxing. The fusion consists of Chinese, Japanese, Vietnamese, and Thai cuisine, and they like to be innovative with old favorites. The service is friendly, and the restaurant is family owned. They are eager to provide you with a great eating experience, and they have vegetarian, vegan, and gluten-free options. The menu includes Wok's Cherry Own Curry, Hot & Spicy Seafood, and Sassy Basil. They have takeout if you want to have your dining experience at home.

Shopping

Mama's Happy - (5630 W 36th St.,, 763-777-5416, website) Mama's Happy is a home decor business started in 2010 by Amanda Ficek because she wanted to have a place to gather creative women around her, both as her colleagues and as her clients. She has had a career in retail merchandising and the fashion business, and she is passionate about home decorating on a reasonable budget. Every piece is picked with thought and care, and they have many refurbished pieces that look better than the original. They carry the Annie Sloan line of chalk paint, soft wax, and brushes. The store provides workshops on these products as they are certified Annie Sloan Chalk Paint Stockists and can answer any question you might have about the products. Amanda and her staff embrace the concept of buying a little happy (a gift given for no reason), and they would love to help you find yours.
Miracle Mile Shopping Center - (Hwy 100 & Excelsior Blvd.,, 952-929-3423, website) Miracle Mile Shopping Center/Mall (the terms are used interchangeable for the place) is a strip mall that is a neighborhood favorite. The first store to open in it in 1951 was Warner Hardware, and the shopping center grew and expanded over the years. There is a Half Price Books for all your used books needs, and there is a family-owned store called Droolin' Moose which delivers a great chocolate shopping experience. Other stores include Orvis, Michael Lynne's Tennis Shop, and Woody's Furniture. On the food side, there is a Pannekoeken Huis and a Subway.
Second Debut - (4300 W 36 1/2th St.,, 952-922-9640, website) Second Debut is a high-end thrift store run by Goodwill-Easter Seals MN. As with all Goodwill endeavors, the aim is to help Minnesotans and Wisconsinites with any job-related issues. This particular store has recognizable brand names for a fraction of the price, and it's focused on clothing and accessories. There are no household items. The store itself is large and welcoming, and the staff encourages you to browse at your leisure. Whatever your fashion needs, you can find something that suits your fancy here--and you'll be helping out others at the same time. It's a win-win situation.
The Shoppes at Knollwood - (8332 Hwy. 7,, 952-563-6670, website) The Shoppes at Knollwood was opened as Knollwood Plaza, an open-air strip mall, in 1955 and became Knollwood Mall along the way. It was enclosed in 1980, and then redone in 2014. That was when it was renamed to The Shoppes at Knollwood as part of the grand reopening in 2015. The stores include DSW, Banana Republic, and J.Crew Factory. There is also the Foss Swim School if you want to learn how to swim. Food/drink-wise, the options include Blaze Pizza, Tropical Smoothie Cafe, and Caribou Coffee
The Shops at West End - (1621 West End Blvd.,, 763-450-0554, website) The Shops at West End is an upscale shopping center that promises you an experience when you visit. The stores include Primp, Francesca's, and Anthropologie. There is the ShowPlace Icon Theatre if you want to see a movie, and there are two workout places as well if you need to energize yourself. If what you're looking for is rest and relaxation, try Hand & Stone Massage and Facial Spa. When you're hungry, you have several options to choose from. There is Punch Bowl Social, Lucky Cricket, and Rojo Mexican Grill.

Nightlife

Bunny's Bar & Grill - (5916 Excelsior Blvd.,, 952-922-9515, website) Bunny's Bar & Grill has been a neighborhood favorite since 1933, and it has a homey atmosphere with a staff who is welcoming to everyone who walks in the door. It's a classic sports bar where you can watch your favorite team as you drink your favorite pint, surrounding by your favorite people. They have a tradition of giving out wooden tokens for half off (worth up to $2.20 on a drink) after the Vikings score a touchdown, which is very popular with the customers. The food is standard bar fare, including pizza, chicken wings, and burgers, and there beer list is long and impressive. They also have arcade games if you are a kid at heart and want to revisit your nostalgic days of yore.
REM5 Virtual Reality Laboratory - (4950 W 35th St.,, 952-855-7592, website) REM5 Virtual Reality Laboratory is a gaming center focused on giving people the VR experience. Not only do they have several VR games such as Elven Assassin, Superhot, and Keep Talking and Nobody Explodes. They also have simulators such as Job Simulator and Vacation Simulator, and they have VR that allows you to enjoy the world around you, such as Ocean Rift and Google Earth. They have educational programs as well including camps for children to learn about industrial design and immersive technology. They have food such as pizza, mini donuts, and brunch flatbread. Their drinks include beer in a can, wine in a can, and n/a drinks in a can. It's a fun night for everyone, and it's an experience of of a lifetime.
REVEAL Rooftop Bar + Lounge - (5075 Wayzata Blvd.,, 763-545-0000, website) REVEAL Rooftop Bar + Lounge is a swish establishment on top of the AC Hotel by Marriott Minneapolis West End, and it is open when the weather is cooperative. It has a relaxing atmosphere and a gorgeous view of Downtown Minneapolis. It's a great place to go if you want to sip on a cocktail while watching a game on the nearby TV. They also have live music through their Skyline Music Series, which makes a sultry summer night even better. Their menu includes bacon-wrapped chorizo stuffed dates, a charcuterie plate, and street tacos. Their drink menu has beer and cocktails, including Stone Tangerine Express (IPA), Estrella (imported lager), Fumar (cocktail), and Daiquiri Shrub (cocktail). They also have bourbon, scotch, rye, liquers, and wines.
The Park Tavern Bowling & Entertainment Center - (3401 Louisiana Ave. S,, 952-929-6810, website) The Park Tavern Bowling & Entertainment Center has been a gathering hub for the neighborhood for over fifty years, and they are a big believer of giving back to the community. They have many events that benefit the community, such as toy drives, Bowling for Equity, and bowling leagues for special needs. They have food as well, including burgers, sandwiches, and meatloaf so you can eat as you bowl. You can drink beer, too, if you like as they have a wide array of choices. Bowling-wise, they have leagues, open bowl, and fundraisers. It's a great place to go for an evening of fun with family and/or friends.

Community Arts & Recreation

Pinot's Palette - (4712 Excelsior Blvd.,, 612-440-6744, website) Pinot's Palette is a place that joins two experiences--art and imbibing, and they even call themselves a 'paint & sip studio'. It's a great place to go with a bunch of friends, sipping on a red while unlocking your inner creativity. It's a casual and comfortable atmosphere where they take your experience seriously. The glasses are creatively decorated, and the staff members are very encouraging. They also have kid-specific events, but the public classes are for adults. Kids aged 13 to 17 are welcome as long as they are with an adult. People must be 21 to purchase alcohol. This is a great event if you want to relax with a glass of wine with your friends while also creating something beautiful.
St. Louis Park Art Fair - (3700 Monterey Dr.,, , website) The St. Louis Park Art Fair is a new tradition that has quickly become a neighborhood favorite. Over sixty local artists were featured in the first one, and the art fair showcased the different talents of the community. It is held at the Recreation Outdoor Center in The Rec Center, and the contact point is Alysha Boie, a local creator who is using a St. Louis Park Arts and Culture Grant to host the art fair. The different mediums include woodworking, painting, baked goods, and crocheting. There will be a community art project and food trucks as well. If you are a lover of arts, you'll want to check out this art fair.
St. Louis Park Friends Of The Art - (6715 Minnetonka Blvd.,, 952-928-6422, website) St. Louis Friends Of The Art was formed in 1995 as a way to support and nurture creative talent and the arts within the community. Their first event was called Celebrate the Arts, and it was an annual city-wide arts festival that occurred for five years. They have had a series of initiatives called Our Town followed by a descriptive, and it has been a way of bringing people in the community together over different aspects of art and culture. Their programs are Arts For Life Scholarships, Gift of Music, Fiscal Sponsorship, and Arts & Culture Grant. If you are a creative person in need of some guidance, they will be able to help you.
The Rec Center - (3700 Monterey Dr.,, 952-924-2540, website) The Rec Center in St. Louis Park has plenty of options if you are looking for something fun to do no matter the season. It has a state-of-the-art Recreational Outdoor Center that is used as a covered ice rink in the winter months, and it can be rented out. It can also be rented in other seasons for football and such as well as wedding receptions. It can hold up to 700 people. The Rec Center also has the Banquet Room that can be rented for important events such as birthday parties and family reunions as well as the Gallery Room that is suited for meetings and smaller events. It also has two indoor ice arenas so you can skate year-round if that's your true passion. In addition, is has the Aquatic Park for all you water lovers out there who like nothing better than to frolic around in the pool when the weather is hot.
Twin Cities Film Fest - (1621 West End Blvd.,, 612-615-8233, website) The Twin Cities Film Fest (TCFF) is an annual event that is highly anticipated all year round by local movie buffs. The members of TCFF are passionate about supporting the visual arts in the community and about nurturing local talent. They show fresh and innovative films that you won't be able to see anywhere else. They have short films as well as more standard-length movies, and they include films from all around the country. They have several programs and events to promote film-making, including Filmmaker Academy: Free Day For Youth, TCFF Film Fellows Program, and panels, workshops, and college fairs. If you are a movie buff, this film festival is for you. The office is located in The Shops at West End.

Events

SEP: St. Louis Park Art Fair - (3700 Monterey Dr.,, , website) The St. Louis Park Art Fair is a new tradition that has quickly become a neighborhood favorite. Over sixty local artists were featured in the first one, and the art fair showcased the different talents of the community. It is held at the Recreation Outdoor Center in The Rec Center, and the contact point is Alysha Boie, a local creator who is using a St. Louis Park Arts and Culture Grant to host the art fair. The different mediums include woodworking, painting, baked goods, and crocheting. There will be a community art project and food trucks as well. If you are a lover of arts, you'll want to check out this art fair.
OCT: 38th Annual Halloween Party - (3700 Monterey Dr.,, 952-924-2540, website) St. Louis Park is including the Little Goblin Bash in their annual Halloween party this year. It will be held at The Rec Center and the ROC. Everyone is encouraged to wear a costume and enjoy the festive activities. DJ Bob will be spinning the spooky tunes, so put on your best dancing shoes if you are attending. There will also be carnival games as well as trick-or-treating on the Mother's Nature Trail with cheerful characters in animal costumes. There will be food supplied by Lunds & Byerlys, and the evening will end with a puppet show. It will be a scarily fun time for everyone in the family.
OCT: Twin Cities Film Fest - (1621 West End Blvd.,, 612-615-8233, website) The Twin Cities Film Fest (TCFF) is an annual event that is highly anticipated all year round by local movie buffs. The members of TCFF are passionate about supporting the visual arts in the community and about nurturing local talent. They show fresh and innovative films that you won't be able to see anywhere else. They have short films as well as more standard-length movies, and they include films from all around the country. They have several programs and events to promote film-making, including Filmmaker Academy: Free Day For Youth, TCFF Film Fellows Program, and panels, workshops, and college fairs. If you are a movie buff, this film festival is for you. The office is located in The Shops at West End.
DEC: U.G.L.Y Sweater Dash - (3520 Louisiana Ave. S,, , website) The U.G.L.Y. Sweater Dash is exactly what the name implies--a race in ugly sweaters. It's in December with the celebrated ugly Christmas sweater tradition, and most participants go all-out in pairing their ugly sweaters with other holiday-related attire. It's a 5K race that runs through Louisiana Oaks Park and by the lighted trees of Oak Hill Park, and a good time is had by all who run. The Park Tavern is one of the sponsors, and they generously offer their location as a place for the runners to gather and warm up after the race. Dig out your ugliest sweater and join in the fun.

Schools

Mouse over each number to get the school rating. Clicking on the number will link you to their (greatschools.org) website with detailed information on each individual school. We are in no way affiliated with GreatSchools.org.
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